Mine action operations in Western Sahara

SafeLane Global was contracted to provide mine action survey, mechanical, explosive ordnance disposal and rapid response capacities east of the Berm in Western Sahara.

Mine action Western Sahara

SafeLane Global was contracted by a global humanitarian client to provide mine action survey, mechanical, explosive ordnance disposal and rapid response capacities east of the Berm in Western Sahara.

The teams originally consisted of 2 x multi task teams (MTTs), a community liaison (CL) team and mechanical mine clearance team, later disbanded in the second season.

During the first season SafeLane Global deployed contracted assets of 2 x MTTs, 1 CL team and a mechanical team in execution of the statement of work.

The CL team conducted technical/non-technical survey and EOD spot tasks, depending on location and tasking.  The MTTs were tasked to conduct technical survey, BAC, and manual mine clearance tasks.

The mechanical team worked with a mine protected vehicle, Casspir, on which was mounted a ground penetrating radar (GPR) system (Amulet).  It deployed to trial the new GPR technology to search and survey confirmed hazardous areas (HA).

The GPR technology worked to search the selected area for anomaly shapes which could be suspected items of UXO/mines over the HA to mark suspected items for further investigation from the team.

The end result showed that VMGPRS can be effectively utilised during technical survey operations as a part of the land release process in defining the conformed hazardous area (CHA) and release the rest of the areas which were constituting suspected hazardous area (SHA) .

SafeLane Global further deployed two training officers to train the mechanical team on the software, equipment and to assist with the installation and implementation of the equipment.

Its project management team drafted a new standard operating procedure (SOP) and conducted operational trials during the first contract season, with positive results.

The main challenge the team faced was the calibration and use over the different types of ground in the desert, which proved difficult to calibrate the equipment to search and survey for anomalies in the ground effectively.  The lowest results showed to be on clay areas, whilst highest were at the sandy areas, which showed that GPR had difficulties on humid type of the ground.

During the second season, the mechanical team was stood down in the April and a third MTT was mobilised in its place. After technical review and discussion with the client it was deemed more operationally and cost effective to deploy and enhance the MTT capacity of the programme.

Contact

Find your solution: talk to SafeLane Global now.

Get in touch